Tag Archives: knitting

DIY: Moss Stitch Infinity Scarf

My knitting “career” is littered with unfinished projects. I don’t think my attention span lends itself to long term projects. I know how to knit. But projects that involve alot of concentration, counting and keeping track are destined to fail in my hands. Period.

DIY MOSS STITCH INFINITY SCARF

So this simple infinity scarf in moss stitch was the perfect project for me. I was finally kicked into action when I saw Tamsin’s gorgeous scarf. She used the Gaptastic Cowl pattern; but this one was just done on the fly by counting and measuring. The completion of this marks my first EVER wearable knitted project! It’s as simple as knitting a super long rectangle (it’s knitted flat rather than on circulars) then joining the  two ends with a simple slip stitch. The moss stitch is super easy and provides a gorgeous texture and ANYONE that can cast on, knit and purl can make this scarf. All in it took me about 5 nights in front of the telly to complete. I really enjoy the repetition and mundanity of moss stitch. It’s like chewing gum for the brain if that makes sense. Very little concentration required and after a while it just becomes a “muscle memory” type thing. A stitch you can do without thinking, whilst binge watching a box set on Netflix 😉

The yarn is Debbie Bliss Cashmerino Aran weight yarn in plum. Super difficult to get a consistent colour representation in the images, I’m sorry! The image above is the closest to the actual colour (if a teeny bit more purpley). Really soft and easy to knit with and this make took 4 x 50g balls. Massive array of colours.DIY MOSS STITCH INFINITY SCARF

The gauge calls for 5mm needles. I wanted a slightly looser/drapier texture so opted for 6mm. These Brittany birchwood needles are so lush to knit with I have to say. I scored them in a charity shop a couple of years back for, like, £1 or something silly! (Charity shops are great places to stock up on knitting needles and crochet hooks ). These are a bit spesh though. They feel wonderful in the hands and stitches just slide along them. £1 well spent!

So…onto the deets. I’ll start by saying this is NOT a knitting pattern per se. I’ve written this so that anyone not familiar with pattern terminology can easily follow it and get the gist. And I don’t want anyone thinking I’m some kind of knitting guru because I am SO not. BUT, I did want to share this because I hear people say so often, that they can’t knit. Seriously, you can knit this. Start by casting on an odd number of stitches. The reason it’s on odd number is that it keeps it simple when knitting each row. Each row is exactly the same. Nothing to remember when you turn your work. Every row starts and ends with a knit stitch. Simple! Great video here for casting on.

DIY MOSS STITCH INFINITY SCARF

I cast on 43 stitches. This gave me a width of about 11″ for my finished scarf in this yarn; which works well for doubling over the scarf when wearing. If you want it wider, cast on a few more stitches. Narrower, cast on a few less. If you’re using a different weight of yarn, simply cast on until the row of stitches on your needles measures the desired width of your finished scarf. Just make sure it’s an odd number.

But let’s work on the basis of this scarf and this yarn for now. Seriously simple. Moss stitch is a beautiful stitch that alternates knit and purl stitches. (K1, P1, K1,P1 etc) Great video for knit here and purl here. This scarf is knit as follows:

  • Cast on 43 stitches
  • Knit the first stitch
  • Bring the yarn between the needles so it’s at the front
  • Purl the next stitch
  • Bring the yarn between the needles so it’s at the back
  • Knit the next stitch
  • Repeat that process to end of row
  • Every row identical

DIY MOSS STITCH INFINITY SCARF

 

 

Keep going until the whole piece measures approx 50-54″ (Make sure you have a small ball of yarn left for finishing) then cast off and join the two ends together with a slip stitch. Weave in ends and you’re done!!

If you’re like me and you’ve never finished a knitting project before…this could just be it! And a great handmade gift too :

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DIY: Recycle Old T Shirts into Yarn

T Shirt Yarn - header image

Last night, I became aware that I’d got through the day having made nothing. I’m leaning quite heavily on creative pursuits at the moment to keep me calm and sane. (Do you find therapy in DIY?) So last night I was feeling a bit twitchy and decided to try making some T Shirt Yarn. Little did I know how addictive it would be!

Now there are more than a few tutorials on this out there. I could have just linked to any one of those but a) that would be a boring post for you! and b) there were a couple of  things that I discovered that I wanted to add into the mix, that I think helped me achieve a better result than my first attempt.

 

Supplies:

Old T Shirts (light to medium weight jersey is better)

Masking tape

Scissors

T SHIRT YARN - SUPPLIES

 

 

Firstly lets talk about side seams. Some T’s have ’em. Some don’t…. This one doesn’t and will make smoother/better yarn because of it…

T SHIRT YARN - NO SIDE SEAM

 

This one does so the yarn I make from it will have little slices of side seam in it every 12-20″, depending on the width of the Tee. We can reduce that bulk a little but it will be there nonetheless. The moral is, if this sort of thing is likely to bug you, pick a tee where the body has no side seams and is one continuous tube of fabric

T SHIRT YARN - WITH SIDE SEAM

Other things to avoid are too thick jersey (like sweatshirt  or ponte thick) and anything with print/transfer or embroidery below the chest area as this prevents the jersey from curling effectively.  So now you’ve got the right kind of Tee this is how you do it…

Step 1: Cut the hem band neatly off the tee. Keep as straight and even a cut as possible…

T SHIRT YARN - STEP 1

 

Step 2: Cut straight across the tee under the arms. Again keep it straight and at right angles to the side seams.

T SHIRT YARN - STEP 2

 

Step 3: Remove any care labels in the side seams as close to the stitching as possible without cutting the stitching itself

T SHIRT YARN - STEP 3A

 

Step 4: Now this may prove controversial, but the full bulk of an overlocked seam in my first ball of nice jersey yarn, bugged me. So this time, I trimmed some of it off. Just the bulky edge, about a mm a way from the double row of straight stitch. Note the double row of stitching as I think this could be key. Not all overlocked seams are formed in the same way. If your overlocked seam looks in any way loose or you see only one row of straight stitch, personally I wouldn’t trim it down. It worked great on this tee and the pink one…but the yellow one (they’re all pictured at the bottom of this post) had a slightly different overlock and unravelled and pulled apart in places so I ended up with several lengths instead of one continuous one…so use your best judgment and if in doubt, cut a strip off the bottom & test first…

T SHIRT YARN - STEP 4

 

Step 5: Now fold the tee body almost in half  (side seam to side seam) but leaving about 1-2″ extra of the bottom layer poking out along the top…

T SHIRT YARN - STEP 5

 

Step 6: Cut strips at least  1″ wide (or marginally wider) up from the folded edge. I used masking tape as a cutting guide to keep my widths even (more uses for masking tape here!). Cut straight up, through all layers, at right angles to the folded edge, and cut through the first overlocked edge but NOT the second. Stop 1-2″ before and leave that part uncut…

T SHIRT YARN - STEP 6

 

You’ll end up with one overlocked edge and a bunch of jersey loops hanging from it

T SHIRT YARN - STEP 8

 

Step 7: Slide the uncut edge over an ironing board.  Start with a tapered, diagonal cut from the outer edge to the first slit. Then from the base of the next slit cut diagonally across to the next top slit. ( Not straight across to the one opposite). You can see the first 2 cuts I made, and the next 3 are marked with dotted lines. Do this all the way along…diagonally from the bottom slit across to the top slit….

T SHIRT YARN - STEP 9

 

…and you’ll end up with a continuous strip like this…

T SHIRT YARN - STEP 10

 

Step 8: Working in approx 18″ lengths, stretch it out and it will roll in on itself to form a skinny tube like this. I found that holding the little bits of side seam, one in my left and one in my right hand, and stretching out just one section at a time, avoided putting undue pressure on the seams.

T SHIRT YARN - STEP 11

 

Step 9: Roll it up!

T SHIRT YARN - STEP 12

 

I nipped to the local charity shop this morning and bought each of these t shirts for 50p each so a super thrifty and eco friendly project. (I’ve kept the leftovers for another project) If you’ve got some lurking in your wardrobe even better! ( BTW, Elliott wanted me to tell you that he helped me style this picture 🙂 He also helped me style another where he artistically arranged leftover strips of each colour in the background. For those of you that don’t know, Elliot is my 6 year old son. He’s actually sat looking over my shoulder as I type this, making sure I type this, and let you know that! Give it a month and he’ll be writing my blog posts for me)

T SHIRT YARN - FINISHED

Now I just need to decide on a project. Have you made or used T Shirt yarn? Please feel free to leave any ideas in the comments below!

 

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